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Our mental health requires as much nurture and nutrition as our physical health.

1 in 4 of us will experience a mental health problem

When life gets busy or times are at their toughest sometimes it takes everything you’ve got just to get through the day; taking time to check in on those rising feelings of stress or anxiety just doesn’t happen. We might just about remember to take a vitamin tablet for our physical health, we may even cram in an exercise class for our bodily fitness, we will race from breakfast to dinner time without pause making sure the To Do list is under control…and all the while our stress levels are rising having an insidious and damaging impact on our health.

Some people have to live daily with the challenges of chronic mental health conditions, others among us may just have periods of depression, anxiety, trauma or stress. 1 in 4 of us (according to Mind.org) will experience a mental health problem of some kind each year and 1 in 6 report experiencing some kind of anxiety per week. This is a growing concern but it is one in which we can assert positive control and look after ourselves and our loved ones.

As we approach World Mental Health Day the Mental Health Foundation https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/ sets out some simple but fundamental preventative things we can all do to improve our resilience and protect our mental health:

  1. Talk about your feelings: sometimes the simplest act of putting your unspoken fears into words can be transformative.
  2. Keep active: regular exercise can boost your self-esteem, and help you concentrate, sleep and feel better.
  3. Eat well: Your brain needs a mix of nutrients in order to stay healthy and function well, just like the other organs in your body.
  4. Drink sensibly: We often drink alcohol to change our mood. Some people drink to deal with fear or loneliness, but the effect is only temporary. When the drink wears off, you feel worse because of the way the alcohol has affected your brain and the rest of your body. Drinking is not a good way to manage difficult feelings
  5. Keep in touch: There’s nothing better than catching up with someone face to face, but that’s not always possible. You can also give them a call, drop them a note, or chat to them online instead. Keep the lines of communication open: it’s good for you!
  6. Ask for help: None of us are superhuman. We all sometimes get tired or overwhelmed by how we feel or when things don’t go to plan. If things are getting too much for you and you feel you can’t cope, ask for help. Your family or friends may be able to offer practical help or a listening ear.Local services are there to help you.
  7. Take a break: A change of scene or a change of pace is good for your mental health. It could be a five-minute pause from cleaning your kitchen, a half-hour lunch break at work, or a weekend exploring somewhere new. A few minutes can be enough to de-stress you. Give yourself some ‘me time’
  8. Do something you’re good at: What do you love doing? What activities can you lose yourself in? What did you love doing in the past? Enjoying yourself can help beat stress. Doing an activity you enjoy probably means you’re good at it, and achieving something boosts your self-esteem.
  9. Accept who you are: We’re all different. It’s much healthier to accept that you’re unique than to wish you were more like someone else. Feeling good about yourself boosts your confidence to learn new skills, visit new places and make new friends. Good self-esteem helps you cope when life takes a difficult turn.
  10. Care for others: Caring for others is often an important part of keeping up relationships with people close to you. It can even bring you closer together

CBD is well-known as a supplement to support mental health. Our bodies are full of cannabinoid receptors. These receptors help regulate our brains and immune systems. This is called our endocannabinoid system, or ECS. When we consume or interact with CBD, the cannabidiols bind to the receptors in our ECS.

Mee CBD is the best supplement I have found for managing daily anxiety associated with poor physical health

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A 2015 review shows CBD interacts with type 1 cannabinoid receptors in our brains. The Type 1 receptor is responsible for the levels of serotonin we produce. Serotonin is the chemical in our brains that regulates our mood, linking it to conditions such as depression and anxiety. When we take CBD, it regulates our serotonin levels.

Ongoing research continues to prove that CBD has a positive impact on mental health conditions. Those who take CBD report feeling calmer and less stressed. The link between the human endocannabinoid system and the cannabidiol compound in CBD means that we have a completely natural way to treat mental health conditions.

Those who have tried Mee CBD as a daily supplement over the course of just one month have reported a positive change in their mental wellbeing, from an improved ability to cope with the day to a marked decrease in the physical symptoms of high stress.

Above all, let’s remember to stay alert to the cues of poor mental health in ourselves and our loved ones, and let’s stay mentally fighting fit this season.

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